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Hey Moms. I just asked about summer bed times in a different post, but I have another summer question. Do you have your children do certain work/reading over the summer, or do you keep summer for playing only? My daughter loves to read, so I'm sure getting her to read won't be a problem. But I was also considering trying to get her to do some different flash cards and and such just to   keep her mind fresh. :-)

What do you all do at your house?

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We always do at least a bit of school-type work every day as well as reading a minimum of 15 min. per day.  (That's not including the bedtime reading aloud to him.)  Kitchen science is always fun AND educational and can incorporate math, too.  I also use the time to target areas no longer covered well in school in the early grades like history and social studies - and he really needs the work on penmenship!  (My son is going into 2nd grade.)  I think math skills are the most important to practice as they are most subject to backslide.  Math games on the computer are a great way to practice their computational skills.  Also, introducing the math that the next grade will getting into - we are gradually working on the multiplication chart - he is thrilled to be doing "advanced" math.  Next target is the areas where he needs additional practice or help - for him that is composition.  Keeping summer journals, science "lab books", and writing book reviews/reports will be on the agenda. 

I try to mix it up - not all things are done every day.  Try to incorporate things you are already doing - if you go to the springs, look up a bit about how they are formed.  See how many gallons of water run in to them daily and do a bit of math with that.  What, if any, microscopic life forms are in there?  Why are they a constant temperature?  How were they used by native americans? 

It requires some preparation on your part.  For me, that's what laptops I can use while I watch TV at night were especially invented for!

Also good - form a group with your kids friends parents.  Share the field trips, research and prep and let the kids learn together.  Kitchen science Tuesday at my house, tie-dying Friday at yours, etc.

 

Thanks for the ideas Jennifer! 

Jennifer said:

We always do at least a bit of school-type work every day as well as reading a minimum of 15 min. per day.  (That's not including the bedtime reading aloud to him.)  Kitchen science is always fun AND educational and can incorporate math, too.  I also use the time to target areas no longer covered well in school in the early grades like history and social studies - and he really needs the work on penmenship!  (My son is going into 2nd grade.)  I think math skills are the most important to practice as they are most subject to backslide.  Math games on the computer are a great way to practice their computational skills.  Also, introducing the math that the next grade will getting into - we are gradually working on the multiplication chart - he is thrilled to be doing "advanced" math.  Next target is the areas where he needs additional practice or help - for him that is composition.  Keeping summer journals, science "lab books", and writing book reviews/reports will be on the agenda. 

I try to mix it up - not all things are done every day.  Try to incorporate things you are already doing - if you go to the springs, look up a bit about how they are formed.  See how many gallons of water run in to them daily and do a bit of math with that.  What, if any, microscopic life forms are in there?  Why are they a constant temperature?  How were they used by native americans? 

It requires some preparation on your part.  For me, that's what laptops I can use while I watch TV at night were especially invented for!

Also good - form a group with your kids friends parents.  Share the field trips, research and prep and let the kids learn together.  Kitchen science Tuesday at my house, tie-dying Friday at yours, etc.

 

A couple places have some great incentives for reading.  Barnes and Noble gives the kids a free book when they read 8 I think over the summer.  I also love the educational type computer games.  Aidan loves going to Disney Junior and loves his LeapFrog gaming system...both have educational components to the games.  I too feel that kids learn a lot in the kitchen as well.  Maybe check out the parent or kid resources on your daughters school website...they offer a lot of different websites and activities to do with your children.  Have fun!

we are always trying to keep ahead of the school learning guidelines. You can look up the reading list for her age group on the library site or even google it. I think im going to start a summer journal where every weekend she darws and writes the fun things she did that week. and continue it until shes off to college :) Summer is for fun but you read to your kids anyways so why not make it a learning time for the both of you? :)

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